Hacktivists Let You Prank Call Russian Officials to Protest War

Wasterussiantime.today, a website allows people to spam calling Russian officials. The website is created by popular hacktivists as part of the digital war to support Ukraine. The hacktivists have put all the Russian official contact numbers on the website and set up many robots and even ask people who support Ukraine to keep spam calls. Groups like Anonymous carry out DDoS attacks against Kremlin-affiliated websites. The website is designed to combine phone pranks and robocalls into an automated weapon aimed at the Russian state.

Ever since Russia began its large-scale seizures in Ukraine, independent hacktivists have conducted hacking campaigns against Russian organizations. Some of which have resulted in leaks of hundreds of gigabytes of Russians’ emails and other private information. The Ukrainian government itself at one point released a list of names and contact details of 620 Russian intelligence agents.

Read More: US Targets Russian Billionaires’ Assets Worth $33 Billion to Help Ukraine

The funny side of this protest

The trick of hacktivists known as Obfuscated Dreams of Scheherazade is a reference to Arabic folklore. The website connects two random Russian officials in a three-way call so you can hear the confusion. The group also claims its database contains more than 5,000 Russian government phone numbers, including the FSB intelligence agency. Outside of listening, you cannot join the call. 

One other website is on the web now made by a Norwegian computer expert. This website islets anyone send an email about the war in Ukraine to up to 150 Russian email addresses at a time.

With the help of this, the Russian people have a chance to hear the truth that their government is hiding. Fabian the maker of the website argues that what he is doing is “not propaganda”.When asked what it feels like to spam millions of people, he replies that the intrusion is justified because the stakes are so high.

Does it endanger unsuspecting recipients? “The email recipient cannot be billed. They receive our email without being able to give their consent, so it’s like receiving a flyer inadvertently. It’s a war. You have to stand up for what you believe in. And I believe in that.

How could Russia respond to the robocall?

When Engadget tried to make a call, an error message appeared. It says, “We’re sorry, we are currently having issues with our phones. Give us a few moments. For Gizmodo, the system managed to connect a dozen Russian officials, even though those calls ended statically.